Monday, August 25, 2008

You Look Good in Those Genes


Jacob M. Appel (with whom this blog and the world is obsessed) strikes again; this time in the Chicago Tribune, just to show he is superior to you.  This time it's an interesting article about DNA and politics.  If nothing else, we are loyal to following the dude's career.

7 comments:

pr said...

Since things seem slow lately, maybe people could take a look at the last 4 (or 7) comments on the link "Would You Publish This Story?" (link is on the right, in the category of "Popular Posts").
I'm asking for people's opinions on 2 paragraphs, so there's no heavy lifting involved.
You suggested, w/r, that The Rejected Quarterly might be interested in "Change," but I queried them and received no reply. I think they're defunct (but aren't we all?).

Steve said...

It's a set up. Don't waste your time. Clever PR has taken a paragraph from a famous novel...so if people rag on it, he can pounce and say, "See, you didn't like this and it's a classic. You're wrong about my work as well." Well, bud, what next?

heynonnynonymous said...

Wow, Steve! Good catch!

heynonnynonymous said...

Wow, Steve! Good catch!

Anonymous said...

Wow, if pr doesn't see the difference between the opening to his story and that paragraph, then he really doesn't have much hope of making it.

bookfraud said...

not to get off topic from well, i'm not sure from what, except it involves something about a famous book, at least appel didn't enter a contest with this essay. or maybe he did and we just don'tknow about it.

pr said...

So, Steve, you could have let the "experiment" play out. I would, of course, have revealed that the paragraph was from Richard Yates' Revolutionary Road. In time, I would. But if people had given their opinions without knowing that, it might have been interesting.
I didn't know that, if you Googled the first sentence of a novel, it would come up on Amazon. I've learned a lot lately.
Here'a another lesson. Some advise that once you've written a piece, be silent about it. Don't explain it, don't defend it. I see the wisdom of that -- now.
Some people liked "Change," some didn't. That's their business. As for me, I believe the story succeeds. I'm pleased with it. I'm also done with it.